Don't Panic


Drupal, blogging and some other posts by Adam Evertsson

drupal

Ever since Drupal 7 I've used GIT to keep track of both my personal repos as the ones the company I work for manage. In short, I use GIT quite a lot. A colleague of mine use GIT to keep track of his computer setup so he easily can pull down his settings and .profile whenever he chooses to reinstall his computer or get a new one. I've heard of a guy (or girl, can't remember) who use GIT to keep track of all his documents. That seems a bit handful, but GIT is wonderful to keep track of the changes in your, for example, Drupal repo. And even if I've used GIT for so long, I'm still learning new stuff about GIT and it makes my daily work even better and more… more

When I started making sites with Drupal 8 I missed a special body class that I sometime need for theming as well as other times, and that's the language body class. When making multilingual sites this comes in handy sometimes. For Drupal 7 this was made possible by the Internationalization (i18n) module, but since that module has been moved into core in Drupal (source) that special body-class-adding-thingamajig seems to have vanished. After facing the need of language id when making this site I started to search for a solution, but came up with very few answers. When I solved it I thought I could make a short entry to spread the knowledge. My needs… more

Ever since I started using Drupal I've wanted to share the knowledge I have gathered around Drupal. I did some screncasts a couple of years ago, in Swedish, and they were appreciated. Then, time disappeared, other projects ate my time. Since I teach the basics of Drupal at schools and more specialized educations for companies, I've never given up on the dream of continuing the screencasts in some way. Earlier this year the company I work for, Kodamera, gave me green light to make screencasts about Drupal. My dream has come true! A website was put together to promote the episodes and so far I have made five screencasts on Drupal. My greatest challenge will… more

When classic Drupal-sites like GotDrupal, YadaDrop, NodeOne and DrupalDude aren't updating their Drupal resource sites and/or pages anymore, there are always new sites around the corner to help you in your Drupal quest. I've listed 5 of them earlier, and here's five more... ModuleNotes If you find the information for the different modules on drupal.org too long and hard to get a grip on, ModuleNotes might ease your pain. Written by users for users, in plain English - "this is what this module do, and it's awesome!". Visit http://modulenotes.com/ Drupalstatus Do you have a bunch of Drupal sites out there? Tired of getting email messages whenever there's… more

15th of January is Drupal's official birthday! Happy birthday, Drupal! As usual, I took it upon me to go and buy a cake for the office and it turned out quite nice this year!

My blog has been suffering alongside my work with DrupalCamp Gothenburg. It's hard work since we're only two guys making it happen this year, and there's a lot done and more to do. It brings me great pleasure to say that we just passed a major mile-stone when releasing the website for DrupalCamp Gothenburg. It's a new take on camp-sites, at least what I can gather. This site wont disappear after a couple of years, when the community looses interest in it. This site will not only promote this year's camp, it will also act as a collection of the earlier sites, tying sessions together, acting like a "blast from the past" - one site to rule them all.  Why, you… more

Fact: Using the Update module for collecting data has been the standard since Drupal 6.0.Another fact: Sites not using that module aren't submitting usage statistics to drupal.org.Yet another fact: Third-party monitoring services are rendering the Update module rather useless.Result: Misleading statistics on Drupal core and module usage. When Drupal 6.0 was released the Update module started submitting statistics to Drupal.org, a great initiative. Though, you can disable this module for different reasons, thus creating misleading statistics on Drupal.org. The same goes for Drupal 7, you can disable the module there as well. Third-party services rendering… more

For long, I've been using Droptor to get an overview of all my Drupal sites and it's a powerful service that not only gives you an overview but also statistics of your content and several checklists (security, performance, SEO and health) to see how your website is doing. It's great and much needed, but there isn't happening a lot at Droptor. I've submitted several suggestions on how to improve their service and they have applauded them, saying that these suggestions will come in newer versions of Droptor but then ... nothing. If you, on top of the lack of evolution of the service, add a couple of lengthy outages, and a complete silence on twitter, their… more

So you're a regular at drupal.org, and feel right at home in groups.drupal.org, Drupal Answers is practically your own living room and Google's results on "drupal" is your best friend. Well, have you tried these resources of Drupal knowledge...? DropBucket Ever had a great line of code you save and re-use over and over again? Well, you're not alone. Not at all. And with DropBucket you can share this with the rest of the Drupal Community, and get some karma along the way. At DropBucket you can find snippets to use with Drush, making modules, theming, you name it. The service is created by Tim Kamanin (TimOnWeb Drupal developer).Visit http://dropbucket.org… more

Don't panic!  Now, why should I name this blog "Don't panic!"? Well, for several reasons I would say. Firstly, why not? Secondly, as a appreciative nod towards Douglas Adams and his wonderful book "Hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy" that had Don't panic! written on the cover of the guide book (which var a compact computer, the iPad of the time I would say). Finally, Don't panic! might soothe some of the feelings Drupal might conjure. Drupal, this computational pile of ones and zeros that builds a system of which you can build almost anything with the web and open source as a common denominator. Thirteen years of age and therefore a competent system that… more